The Hunt for History

In order to learn about all of the battles of the civil war without having to research each one individually, we were each were assigned one battle to research and create a short summary of.
When we finished researching our topics, we all created a google doc with the information.
The google docs came out looking like this:
Now that we had all of the information about our battle organized into a googledoc, everyone created QR codes with the links. We all then printed out these QR codes and hid them around the school. The codes were organized so that the first QR code had a clue on it’s google doc leading you to the next code, and so on and so on. This formed a sort of scavenger hunt where the class went around the school scanning into google docs to learn about different battles in the Civil War.
When we got back to the room and organized all of information we acquired, the class had a conversation over padlet. Here we answered the essential questions for the lesson by posting what we thought the answer was onto the wall. This was especially helpful because it allowed everyone to contribute and clarify their understanding of each battle’s significance.
The padlets looked like this:
From the scavenger hunt, I learned about which theater each battle was held in and what the outcome was. From this information, I was able to determine the ultimate victor of each theater and why that was the case.
In the Eastern theater, the Union is the unexpected ultimate victor. Initially, it seemed as though the Confederacy would be successful because of their victories in battles such as  Fredricksburg and Chancellorsville, but their successes eventually began to dwindel. Battles, like the Battle of Wilderness, became bloodier with less if a definite victor until the Union slowly conquered the confederacy. The union’s delayed success is most likely the result of their change in leadership, allowing Ulysses Grant to lead then into victory.
Battle of the Wilderness Allison, K. &. (n.d.). “Battle of the Wilderness.” May 6th, 1864      http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3g01748/?co=pga.

Battle of the Wilderness
Allison, K. &. (n.d.). “Battle of the Wilderness.” May 6th, 1864 http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3g01748/?co=pga.

In the naval theater, the Union claimed ultimate victory in both the east and the west. The Union won the Battle of Fort Henry and caused considerable damage to the Confederates during the Battle of Hampton Roads, even though it came out to a draw. This was largely because their more advanced naval technology allowed them to inflict severe damage on the Confederate ironclads.
The Battle of Fort Henry "Fort Henry" 1862. CWSAC Battle Summaries. NPS.gov http://www.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/tn001.htm Accessed March 6, 2014.

The Battle of Fort Henry
“Fort Henry” 1862. CWSAC Battle Summaries. NPS.gov http://www.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/tn001.htm Accessed March 6, 2014.

In the Western theater, the Union was the ultimate victor once again, winning a majority of their battles including the Battle of Shiloh. The Union was able to take on this considerable lead because, having a seize ably larger resource of men, they were able to call for reinforcements.
Each google doc also contained information explaining why certain sides won certain battles. With this information for every battle, it was easy to make out each side’s trends that led to success.
For battles won by the Confederacy, strategy and strong military leaders were usually the secrets to their success. This was the case because it was with stragety that the Confederacy was able to make up for their lack of resources and men, like in The Battle of Chancellorsville when the outnumbered confederate army defeated the Union forces by splitting up their army in order to attack from different sides.
The  Battle of Chancellorville Waud, A. R. The Battle at Chancellorsville. 2863. Sketch. Civil War Harpers Weekly.http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/ civil-war/1863/may/battle-chancellorsville.htm (Accessed March 6, 2014).

The Battle of Chancellorville
Waud, A. R. The Battle at Chancellorsville. 2863. Sketch. Civil War
Harpers Weekly.http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/
civil-war/1863/may/battle-chancellorsville.htm (Accessed March 6, 2014).

The Union also won many of their victories through the skill of their generals and the strageties they used, but they also were able to use their abundance of resources to their advantage. This especially came in the form of soldiers, like in the Battle of Shiloh when the Union won by calling for more reinforcements.
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